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The National Weather Service in Birmingham said  that "severe storms remain in the forecast tonight over Central AL. The evening update notable expanded the Enhanced area into Lamar Co. Damaging winds, hail, and a couple tornadoes will remain possible overnight beginning after 9 pm and continuing through morning."

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There is a Flood Warning for the Sucarnoochee River at Livingston [AL] till further notice.

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"Another round of strong to severe thunderstorms will likely impact Alabama tonight into the pre-dawn hours tomorrow (the main window is from 9pm-6am).The main concern again is from large hail and strong winds. A brief, isolated tornado can’t be totally ruled out," said James Spann, ABC 33/40, and Townsquare Media Tuscaloosa Chief Meteorologist.
National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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“Severe Thunderstorms are possible across all of Central Alabama, with two potential waves of storms forecast through tonight. Threats Include damaging wind gusts and large hail. A brief tornado cannot be ruled out. Locally heavy rainfall could produce flooding,” said the National Weather Service in Birmingham.

There is an "Areal Flood Watch" valid at Jun 18, 9:00 PM CDT for Autauga, Bibb, Chilton, Dallas, Elmore, Greene, Hale, Lowndes, Marengo, Montgomery, Perry, Pickens, Sumter, Tuscaloosa [AL] till Jun 19, 7:00 AM CDT

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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Upcoming Week Heads Up

The upcoming week is shaping up that our area could have more rounds of unsettled weather with a chance of showers and thunderstorms daily. However, “the sun out at times with some good breaks from the rainy periods,” said the National Weather Service in Birmingham.

Sunday – Father’s Day Outlook

Timing

You can expect 2 rounds of severe weather today.

Round 1: now through 5 p.m. - updated at10:52 a.m.

Round 2: 9 p.m. – Monday 7 a.m.

Possible Threats

Damaging wind gusts

Large hail

Locally heavy rainfall/flooding is also possible

Round 2 also includes a chance of a tornado or two.

Storm Prediction Center
Storm Prediction Center
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Risk Areas

Round 1:

The entire Townsquare Media coverage area is under a “marginal” risk zone. This information has been updated at 10:52 a.m.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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Round 2:

A portion of the Townsquare Media coverage area is under an “enhanced” risk zone which includes Sumter, Greene, Hale, Perry, and a portion of Pickens, Bibb and Tuscaloosa counties.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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(Source) For more information from the National Weather Service in Birmingham, click here. 

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