Yes, the NFL's highest paid safety in league history is not only a stud on the gridiron, but apparently at the country club as well.

Minkah Fitzpatrick, after signing a massive 4-year, $73.6 million deal to stay with the Pittsburgh Steelers this week, took his talents to a bit of a lesser known sport, Pickleball.

Fitzpatrick and a few other Steelers teammates, TJ Watt and Alex Highsmith, were playing some pickup games of pickleball when they were approached by 64-year old Meg Burkardt, who decided to show the young stars the ropes of the sport.

Burkrdt was wholly unaware she was facing off against some of the best athletes the NFL has to offer, but that didn't stop her.

Burkardt's daughter, Natalie, shared a message from her mother on Twitter, highlighting just how unaware she was of who she was playing with.

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Burkardt said, in the message, "So I rolled up to North Park tonight to jump in a pickup pickleball game. Started playing with these guys," the message continued, "Had no idea who they were. Last game, the guy in the green shirt and I whooped the other two, then everyone there wanted to take our photo."

Safe to say Fitzpatrick will now hold some bragging rights over his teammates when it comes to the pickleball court.

The Steelers kickoff their 2022 season on August 13 when they take on the Seattle Seahawks in the first preseason matchup for both teams. The regular season begins just a few weeks later on September 11 with a face off against the Cincinnati Bengals.

Fitzpatrick finished last season as one of the top performing safeties in all of the league, and with a new contract under his belt, the streak of dominance should continue for the former Bama star.

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