Yesterday, former Birmingham Stallions tight end Sage Surratt signed a one-year $750,000 deal with the Los Angeles Chargers.

Courtesy of Birmingham Stallions Instagram @usflstallions
Courtesy of Birmingham Stallions Instagram @usflstallions
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Before signing with the Stallions, Surratt was a three-star wide receiver out of Denver, North Carolina. Surratt after his senior season decided to stay close to home and signed with the Wake Forest Demon Decans.

As a freshman, he only caught 581 yards but Surratt's sophomore season was when he became a household name. In his sophomore season, Surratt had a 1,000-yard season, and 15 touchdowns, and became a semifinalist for the Fred Biletnikoff Award.

Many Wake Forest fans expected Surratt to have another 1,000-yard season in 2020 and then forgo his senior to enter the 2021 NFL Draft. But because of COVID-19 and his safety, Surratt decided to sit his junior season out and train for the 2021 NFL Draft. After being picked up as an undrafted free agent by the Detroit Lions, Surratt spent most of his time with the Lions on the practice squad before getting released in September.

What Surratt needed was a change and another place to show off his talents to NFL teams. This is where Skip Holtz and the Birmingham Stallions came in and pick up Surratt in the sixth round of the USFL Draft. After being converted to tight end, Surratt did not play much as he was the backup to Cary Angeline. But when Surratt came on the field he caught 11 passes for 148 yards, averaging 13 yards per catch.

Surratt now joins a Los Angeles Chargers team that is ready to make a Super Bowl push led by Justin Herbert. Surratt will not get many catches because he is behind Gerald Everett and Donald Parham Jr.

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